“You have to get to a point where you’re completely confident and know exactly what you want, but not so egotistical to think that someone might not have a better idea than you,” he says. “You have to have the confidence to know what you want and how to get it, but also to know when to step back and say, Alright, this guy’s got a lot of experience, and what he’s bringing to the table might be beyond what I had in mind, so I’d better listen up.” - Luke Winslow King on recording his new album, “Everlasting Arms,” with Frenchmen Street musicians in New Orleans.

“I think dubstep draws so many screamo fans because of the structural similarities—especially in the hardcore breakdowns,” Srigley mused. He then took a swig of his Red Bull and offered me a double shot of Jaeger. After we’d knocked them back, he started to tell me about one of his favorite songs, “Sleep With One Eye Open (Tek-One Remix),” but duty called and he was pulled to the stage before I could hear more. - Justin Picard in conversation with Christian Srigley of Adventure Club

"We rented a goat. I set fire to a pentagram on his front lawn. He’s such a goofball, and I mean that in the best of ways. Phil’s non-stop. People heard we’ve been working together and assume that he’s this super intense, super serious dude all the time. No, it’s just the opposite. I hope we can do more of it; there’s endless silliness between us." - comedian Dave Hill on making the  heavy metal comedy “Metal Grasshopper” with Down’s Philip H. Anselmo - online now.

Two shots by Patrick Ainsworth of St. Vincent live at the House of Blues in New Orleans. According to Stephanie Chen:
her performance highlighted how unpredictable she can be. She writhed on the floor during “Krokodil”, viciously spitting her lyrics. She languidly rolled her head backwards like a cat before snapping it back, wide-eyed. For “Your Lips are Red” in the encore, she precariously monkey-climbed up a speaker and swung on pipes under the balcony, then was hoisted up by an audience member. She walked the outer ledge along the banister’s length, stealing beers and leaning in to talk to fans—in heels, nonetheless. Her band kept playing, but they (and her tour manager) kept watching with  wariness and awe. I heard someone near me mutter, horrified, “She’s going to fall. Oh my god, I’m about to watch St. Vincent die,” but she managed to injure only her knee in the process. Two shots by Patrick Ainsworth of St. Vincent live at the House of Blues in New Orleans. According to Stephanie Chen:
her performance highlighted how unpredictable she can be. She writhed on the floor during “Krokodil”, viciously spitting her lyrics. She languidly rolled her head backwards like a cat before snapping it back, wide-eyed. For “Your Lips are Red” in the encore, she precariously monkey-climbed up a speaker and swung on pipes under the balcony, then was hoisted up by an audience member. She walked the outer ledge along the banister’s length, stealing beers and leaning in to talk to fans—in heels, nonetheless. Her band kept playing, but they (and her tour manager) kept watching with  wariness and awe. I heard someone near me mutter, horrified, “She’s going to fall. Oh my god, I’m about to watch St. Vincent die,” but she managed to injure only her knee in the process.

Two shots by Patrick Ainsworth of St. Vincent live at the House of Blues in New Orleans. According to Stephanie Chen:

her performance highlighted how unpredictable she can be. She writhed on the floor during “Krokodil”, viciously spitting her lyrics. She languidly rolled her head backwards like a cat before snapping it back, wide-eyed. For “Your Lips are Red” in the encore, she precariously monkey-climbed up a speaker and swung on pipes under the balcony, then was hoisted up by an audience member. She walked the outer ledge along the banister’s length, stealing beers and leaning in to talk to fans—in heels, nonetheless. Her band kept playing, but they (and her tour manager) kept watching with  wariness and awe. I heard someone near me mutter, horrified, “She’s going to fall. Oh my god, I’m about to watch St. Vincent die,” but she managed to injure only her knee in the process.

Beck by Patrick Ainsworth Sunday at the House of Blues in New Orleans. 

One thing I touch on in my review is the distance Beck creates from his audience, whether it’s through his deadpan look, his wry stage patter, or lyrics that ward off clear meaning. There’s something very endearing about him despite that, and where I was by the side bar, there was a feeling of warmth and community despite being wedged in. I attribute that to Beck and not simply the occasion. People weren’t simply happy to see him there; they were happy to see him.” - a review and notes on the show.

Damn is this hard! Single Mothers play the Circle Bar in New Orleans Nov. 4 as part of a national tour. 

Sam France of Foxygen at One Eyed Jacks in New Orleans. 

Objectively, the band’s lack of restraint was a problem. The stage volume was so loud that the PA could only do so much for instruments than went through it, and France’s voice was often obscured because of it. For me, it was essential to the night as the band manifested a rock ’n’ roll swagger that I wish I saw more often. The show was simply physical and fun, and I doubt they’ll strike this balance again.”

 “A lot of time our music comes from a dark place, but we’re not dark people. We goof off a lot. We’re silly. A lot of people might not expect us to be as normal or goofy as we actually are in real life.” - Josh Carter on Phantogram, which plays a sold out show at The Republic in New Orleans tonight. 

A playlist of cover songs bigger than the originals. Here’s the story behind the list, as well as link to a playlist of songs covered.

(Source: Spotify)